Book Talk: Phil De Luna on “Accelerated Materials Discovery”

In his latest book, Phil De Luna, PhD delves into the complexity of automated discovery. To learn more about the future of scientific development, we sat down with Phil for a book talk.

What role do computer simulations, data analysis, and robots have in the future of scientific development? How are scientists currently utilizing these resources to push scientific discovery forward?

Phil De Luna, PhD, who is the Director of the Materials for Clean Fuels National Research Center in Canada, approaches these questions in his latest edited book with De Gruyter: “Accelerated Materials Discovery: How to Use Artificial Intelligence to Speed Up Development”, which was published in March 2022.

In an interview with De Gruyter Acquisitions Editor Christene Smith, PhD, he talks about accelerated discovery, the future of research and development, and how to communicate complex scientific concepts to a general audience. Following this conversation, we hear from him and his podcast co-host Liora Raitblat on “What’s New In Automated Discovery” from their Podcast “What’s New In…”.

The conversation is also available as a podcast:

You can find our podcast also at Spotify and Apple Podcasts.

[Title image by JGalione/E+/Getty Images

Phil De Luna

Phil De Luna, PhD is a carbontech innovator working towards a just and sustainable future. He currently serves at the National Research Council of Canada. In 2019, he was among the "Forbes Top 30 under 30". You can learn more about him on his website.

Liora Raitblat

Liora Raitblat is a digital coach passionate about helping people embrace change and innovation. She currently works at Export Development Canada (EDC). Check out her TEDx talk "Designing Choices that Ignite Change".

Christene Smith

Christene Smith, PhD is an Acquisitions Editor at De Gruyter focused on materials science and industrial chemistry. Previously she was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces.

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